What can we learn from South Korea?

Of all the places I’ve visited, I’ve not seen technology so deeply embedded into daily life anywhere as much as in South Korea. Boasting technology giants such as Samsung and LG, South Korea places a conspicuous high value on technology in practically all aspects of life.

Korea’s remarkable technology driven growth has also been accompanied by improvements in social equity. How? Investment in human capital – as evidenced by their PISA results in recent years.

South Korea is well known for their results in the OECD PISA survey

Korea rides high in PISA (pic c/o Wikipedia)

Unlike Finland, whose high ranking in PISA can be attributed to excellent public schooling, Korea’s investment in human capital is significantly influenced by private investment. Parents with school-age children spend close to 25 percent of their income on education and all parents spend a large portion of their income on supplementary educational materials. Private education cost 3.95% of GDP in 2006. According to colleagues in South Korea, students acquire about 30 percent of their formal learning through their schooling, and the rest through supplementary measures.  

So what motivates parents to spend such large amounts of money on private tutoring outside the state schooling system? The main driver is that education is viewed as being crucial for success. At three or four years old, Korean children begin the long and strenuous race to higher education where Science and Engineering dominate.

Examination time is a very serious times of the year and the whole pattern of society changes. Businesses often start at 10AM to accommodate parents who have helped their children study late into the night and on the evenings before exams. The entire schooling system is geared to college entrance, so the curriculum of most schools is structured around the content of the entrance examination.

The Korean government spends generously on education (4.5% GDP in 1986); children spend a lot of days in school (220 days in Korea vs 180 days in the US); and school children work very long hours too. While these factors help with test scores, Korea is remarkably inefficient at a PISA criterion known as “study effectiveness”. South Korea ranks only 24th out of 30 developed nations in this measure. Top in study effectiveness is Finland, where time in school and hours spent studying is significantly less than Korea.

While many if not most other countries look on Korean performance on international tests like PISA with envy, in Korea itself there appears to be an intense pressure to do better, and in this highly technocratic country, its little surprise that technology is seen to be an important component.  

Technology Developments

Korea has been ‘computerizing’ schools for the last 15 years or so, and was the first country in the world to provide high-speed internet access to every primary, junior, and high school. ICT is also an increasing focus in the Korean Government’s education strategy, and in recognition of their progress, Korea won 1st prize from UNESCO for ICT in Education in 2007. So you’d be forgiven for thinking that this lead to Korea coming top in PISA Digital Literacy tests in June 2011 – however computer use is often restricted to teachers presenting information to students.

The real reason Korean students do so well in Digital Literacy is the intense use of technology after school – in Internet cafes, “cram schools” and the home where children can use the world’s fastest home Internet connections – on average 100 Mbps now, and with plans to increase this to 1 Gbps.

Several government initiatives have been set up to bridge the gap between the different levels of effectiveness of learning at home and at school. The overall goal of Government ICT initiatives is to ensure that by 2014 Korean school children will be competent with 21st century skills and are talented at innovating with future digital technology.

Much of the government’s initiative in ICT is channelled through KERIS – a Government Research Institute that acts as the country’s national ICT/education agency. KERIS’ Future Schools programme has conducted 39 research projects and 14 development projects focussed on new learning methods based on new technology. 

Infrastructure Development

The current priority from a budget standpoint is the acquisition of hardware and modernising class facilities. By 2010 there was a ratio of 5 students per PC – the intent of this investment was to support the development of creativity and problem-solving.

IT Expenditure Priorities

A second budget priority is to increase the number of classrooms that have been transformed to achieve “ubiquitous-learning” (u-learning).

Digital Textbook Project

KERIS has been piloting ‘digital textbooks’ in various forms in preparation for the move by 2015 to using digital textbooks in all schools in all subjects at all levels. The idea is that digital textbooks will be accessed/viewed on many different types of devices, from tablets to desktops to laptops to phones.

Cyber Home Learning System

In an attempt to reduce the cost of private education KERIS also developed content for the Cyber Home Learning System. Launched in 2004, CHLS is an online learning service supporting student’s self-directed learning. Click here to find out more – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CF8XdvA4ajk

Cyber Home Learning System

The next generation of the CHLS will include community, e-portfolio and analytical functions.

Next Generation of CHLS

EDUNET

KERIS set up and operates EDUNET, an educational information service which distributes a diverse range of high quality educational content. Content ranges from sound, photo, image, animation, module and video and is all specified by curriculum. As of October, 2010, the number of EDUNET users reached 6.17 million out of a school student population of 7.7m. To see a sample of the content, view a short video here. 

Education Broadcasting Services on the Internet (EBSi)

A service that has seen a sharp rise in growth recently is EBSi. This is where key education broadcasting service assets are made available for download. In 2010, daily usage of video-clips of lectures was 574,461, a 78% increase from the same period of the previous year.  

Teacher Training

Advances have been made too in teacher training. Not only are increasing numbers of teachers licenced to teach ICT, distance education training based on e-Learning has become the core method of teachers training. Distance learning is available to students too via “Air and Correspondence High School”.

NEIS (National Education Information Service)

The Korean Government is keen to develop the use of data systems in education. In a drive to reduce teacher workload, an administration system called NEIS (National Education Information Service) was developed. By streamlining procedures, many administrative processes can now be done in one-step. The system connects all stakeholders of the student, to allow them to get “to Know Our Children Better”. NEIS integrates student records across a range of fields including assessments, examination and health data.

The first task in creating NEIS was to develop the physical infrastructure. The aging facilities of the overall education management centre and 16 Metropolitan and municipal education offices were replaced. 3,800 servers with databases were installed in schools and integrated into a datacentre comprising 100 servers in upstream education offices.

To help teachers adapt, training is provided, and structured guides are available on the teacher area of Edunet.

 

(MPOE – Metropolitan and Provincial Offices of Education)

(MEST – Ministry of Education, Science and Technology)

After infrastructure, the next key ingredient was Business Process Reengineering and Information Strategy Planning (BPR/ISP) for constructing the business management system for the MPOEs. A transmission system for electronic funds transfer (EFT) system was created at the Korea Financial Telecommunications and Clearings Institute.

The School Information Disclosure System allows anyone including students and parents to easily receive information about schools. The system is designed to increases parents and the local community’s interest and participation in the schooling system. In addition, the government and the Offices of Education are expected to boost policy achievements by establishing even more efficient policies through situational reality analysis of school units using the School Information Disclosure System.

Where next?

Whilst Korea is developing one of the best IT infrastructures in the world, there are three key areas that need focus:

  • According to “Adapting Education to the Information Age”, Software Infrastructure in Korea is behind to developed countries and a change is required to develop capacity in this area.
  • A second area for development is lifelong learning. 28% of adults participated in the lifelong learning in 2009, which is lower than major advanced countries – eg EU average participation rate is 37.9%.
  • Perhaps the most important area of focus is 21st century skills. Korea has few programs in this area, and with Communication and Collaboration now part of the PISA 2012 framework, this area is in need of development.

To learn more:

Excellent blog article by Michael Trucano with links to in-depth resources: http://blogs.worldbank.org/edutech/e-learning-in-korea-in-2011-and-beyond

Memorisation or Understanding? – Erik Mazur

Think of something you are really good at – something that you excel in to the point that others would comment on just how good you are at it.

Now think about how you achieved this. What did you do to become excellent at that particular thing? Which of these best describes how you acquired your excellence:

1. Trial and error

2. Lecture

3. Practice

4. Apprenticeship

5. Other

If you picked “Practice” you will have been in the majority. If you picked “Lecture” you will have been in an extreme minority. And yet, lecturing is how most of education is “delivered”.

So starts Erik Mazur’s talk on “Memorisation or understanding – are we teaching the right thing?”

Erik Marur is a Professor of Physics and Applied Physics at Harvard University and has spent his teaching career applying scientific principles to teaching and learning. Making extensive use of data, Professor Mazur shows that much “instruction” only gives an illusion of learning as its based on memorisation, not understanding.

“I thought I was a good teacher until I discovered my students were just memorising information rather than learning to understand the material”. Professor Mazur explains how he came to the conclusion that it was his teaching that caused students to fail, and how he changed his approach with the result of significant improvements to his students’ performance.

For the full story, watch this Youtube video (fast forward to 3:02 if you want to skip the intros):

Putting the “i” into Singapore Schooling

With top rankings in PISA and TIMMS, Singapore is the envy of many schooling systems around the world. Whilst ICT is just one of a range of factors that affect learning outcomes, it is a key tool for meeting at least two of the four key desired outcomes of the Singapore schooling system – for all students to become self-directed and collaborative learners.

Singapore was one of the first countries in the world to have a national strategy for ICT in Schools. A succession of well-planned, funded and executed programmes focussing initially on infrastructure and training, and more recently focussing on self-directed learning – has driven effective use of ICT. For details of Singapore’s main ICT projects, see http://wp.me/P16Iyp-46

A great showcase for the effectiveness of this investment is Crescent Girls’ School, a member of the “Future School” programme, and recently awarded the status of Mentor School by Microsoft. Crescent also hosted the CRADLE conference on 1st – 3rd August.

On the surface, Crescent could be any other Secondary School, but a quick glance at the trophy cabinet next to the reception makes it clear that this school is totally committed to high performance. Crescent’s aim is to be at the forefront of harnessing technology to enhance learning outcomes. ICT is used extensively in both delivery and assessment and the school’s 1300 students each have their own Tablet PC. The goal of using ICT is to give students a degree of choice over what they learn and how they learn.

The students engage in a wide range of activities including 2D, 3D animation and robotics; multimedia production; photo-shooting and editing; and development and use of e-books. Particularly impressive is the use of Tablet PCs’ “inking” features for a range of activities including highly impressive manga artwork.

Crescent is moving towards project based learning with a series of “Integrated Secondary Curricula” programmes.

Virtual Reality is used at the school too. For example, in Geography, students experience immersive content showing erosion in a river – a concept that is much easier to grasp when viewing 3d animated rocks being swept along by the current from the perspective of the river bed.

Particularly impressive at Crescent is the way that teachers engage in the content creation process. For example, a complete suite of applications and content have been developed for the Tablet PC that not only exploits the pen and inking technologies but also address a range of different learning styles.

Taking this process further, teachers specified collaborative games to take advantage of the MultiTouch features in Windows 7 and HueLabs’ “Heumi” multitouch (Surface) devices. This means that students can now engage in a wide range of collaborative learning experiences, such as learning to write Chinese. As impressive as the technology itself is the way in which the room in which the Heumi devices are deployed. Here, in the “iCove”, strong colour coding of the devices and the seating, enable teachers to group learners according to their learning objectives.

More recently the school has introduced a biometric system that not only automatically records the students as present but takes their temperatures as they come into the school in the morning, enabling their health to be monitored.

The infrastructure that sits behind Crescent’s ICT provision is highly impressive. The infrastructure foundation is a Campus-wide wireless network with 100 Mbps Broadband. Tablet PCs are stored in steel lockers, and batteries are charged at charging stations.

Approximately 30 on-premises servers perform a range of essential back-end functions from authentication to content management. The Server infrastructure – based on a Microsoft platform – supports a rich tapestry of capabilities including:

  • i-Connect Learning Space – a role based portal for organising student’s learning and activities
  • Pearson’s Write to Learn – a system that helps “automate” the marking of essays
  • HeuX – Huelabs Classroom Management System – with lesson management, digital book library, real-time Communication and Collaboration include notes-sharing and social media; screen monitoring and broadcasting; Presence awareness; attendance; Video Conferencing
  • i-Media – content management system.
  • Interactive books

These solutions are supported by Windows Server; SQL Server; Microsoft SharePoint Portal Server; System Center; Live Communications Manager; Hyper-V and Live@Edu. Much of the learning that takes place at Crescent happens after school hours, and the Virtual Private Network enables students to have 24×7 access. It’s not uncommon to see the portal being used by students at home at 2.00AM.

Singapore schools benefit from very high quality teachers (only 10% of applicants get admitted into teacher training). This is reflected in the staff at Crescent. Principal, Mrs Eugenia Lim, supported by Chief Technology Architect for Learning, Mr Lee Boon Keng, have a highly structured and team orientated approach, underpinned by a strong focus on continuous professional development.

Every hour, the chimes of Big Ben ring across the school signifying a change of lesson. As with Cornwallis School in Kent in the UK, I was totally inspired by what I saw at Crescent but couldn’t help wondering whether a shift from time-based to a performance-based model would better fit such a technology rich approach to learning. Nonetheless, Crescent’s use of ICT is without doubt world leading.

Whilst Crescent Girls’ School is clearly a leader amongst leaders, it’s far from unique in Singapore in the way in which it innovates with technology. Singapore schools benefit from long term, consistent policy and investment in ICT in schooling. With their structured approaches, strong management and deep understanding of how ICT can make learning more effective, Singapore schools look set to continue to show the world how it’s done.

Fortunately for us all, Crescent Girls’ School are “giving back” by encouraging people to visit the school – both physically and virtually.

Thanks to Eugenia Lim, Lee Boon Keng and all the staff and students at Crescent Girl’s School.

The “Strategic” Phase

This is the third in a series of articles that aim to help schooling systems develop their technology, the first being “Taking the First Steps“ and the second, Taking the Next Steps – The ‘Enhanced’ Phase.

There are four distinct phases through which technology in schooling evolves. The first phase is characterized by access. In the next phase, technology is used to enhance existing processes. The third phase is characterized by using technology strategically. No longer is technology considered a “bolt-on”, or “veneer” on top of existing processes – it now helps drive schooling towards strategic goals such as significantly improved learning and better return on investments. In the final phase, leading edge schools use ICT to transform their operations, using it to personalize learning, integrate deeply with the wider community, run extremely efficient administration systems and develop a culture of performance.

‘Strategic’ Phase Vision

In the Strategic phase, technology becomes a key asset in achieving the strategic goals of an organisation. It’s about restructuring work and processes and doing things differently.

Typically in this phase, the strategic goals of an organisation would include raising standards and improving performance, and technology is a strategic tool for achieving these strategic goals by enabling:

  • Intelligent intervention – data driven support for learners
  • Connected Learning Communities – fully exploiting all available resources, and integration with the local community
  • Monitoring, analysis and planning – data driven decision making
Four phases of ICT implementation

Goals

Intelligent Intervention

This is essentially about using data to make well informed decisions about what students need to learn or do next. To fully personalise the learning experience students should be constantly assessed as they move through their schooling, and their learning pathways should continuously evolve. This relies on highly effective feedback loops and systems which dynamically adapts to the twists and turns of the learning process, and sets challenging learning goals and tasks. This is extremely difficult to do within a paper-based setup, but can be made a lot easier through using IT systems that provide analytic and workflow capabilities.  Intelligent tutoring systems, and managed learning environments, are becoming more commonplace and increasingly sophisticated.

Monitoring, Analysis and Planning

To manage an organisation strategically, as opposed to fighting fires, the ability to monitor performance, analyse results and plan for improvements is fundamental. Organisations wanting to manage strategically must have three key capabilities:

Monitoring

This capability provides managers with the ability to know “what is happening” and “what has happened.” Organisations implement dashboards, scorecards, or reports to monitor their performance. These visual applications allow managers to keep an eye on important indicators of their organisation’s health.

Analysis

This capability provides managers with the ability to know what is happening and why. To analyse performance, organisations implement solutions that are often very interactive in nature and allow managers to investigate the root cause of issues they see in their dashboards, scorecards, or reports.

Planning

This capability provides the organisation with the ability to model what should happen. Organisations develop processes and tools to conduct the essential planning, budgeting, and forecasting exercises. These processes allow managers to align groups and individuals around the metrics that drive the organisation—for instance: “what are our examination result targets?” or “what is our spending versus our revenue?”

Connected Learning Communities

Whilst there may be elements of learning that require independent work, learning only really acquires meaning in a social context, and the most immediate and direct social context for schooling is the local community.

ICT can be used to connect together all those who can make a contribution to students’ learning – e.g. local business, community resources (e.g. museums/libraries), parents and 3rd party learning services. It can connect students to inspiring individuals and inspirational speakers; promote debate and engagement between collaborators in face-to-face or virtual groupings; and provide mentoring opportunities. Connecting stakeholders together in a Connected Learning Community has enormous benefits such as engaging parents more deeply in the learning process, speeding-up processes and improving students’ connections with the outside world. The core of a connected learning community is a portal that can be accessed from anywhere.

Scenarios

Student Access

In the Strategic phase, students have continual access to their own learning devices. These devices need to enable a range of learning scenarios (not just content consumption), be rugged, easy to repair and support, manageable on a network.

Devices should be available to students so they can learn anytime anywhere, access content, learning management and communication and collaboration tools via the Connected Learning Community Portal.

Anytime Anywhere Learning = access to devices + learning services

Having access to their own devices enables students to experience a wide range of learning scenarios:

ICT enables a wide range of learning styles

Classroom

Classrooms need to accommodate an increasingly wide range of learning styles, and equipment needs to be laid out in quite different ways according to the demands of each different learning task, for example:

Different learning tasks require different floorplans

BECTA provided the following guidance to UK schools on different classroom layout options:

Pods – separate circular / hexagonal / octagonal benches with workstations
Hexagonal pods
Advantages
  • No corners with 2 computers, so no dead spots that cannot be used
  • No extra space required for 2 pupils to share a computer
  • Can support collaborative work as users working around ‘one pod’
Pods – squares with computers on two sides only
Square pods
Advantages
  • No corners with 2 computers, so no ‘dead spots’ that cannot be used
  • No extra space required for 2 pupils to share a computer
  • Can support collaborative work as users working around ‘one pod’
Bays built along walls
Bays
Advantages
  • Teacher can more or less see all computer screens from the centre of the room
  • Provides opportunity to use the centre of the room for tables enabling work away from the computer, and to gather groups for discussion
  • Cabling and electrical work is cheaper and easier than ‘pod’ designs as along the room edge.

School

In the Strategic phase, IT has become a strategic asset to schools. With the infrastructure optimised in the Enhanced phase, we now turn our focus on workloads delivered by servers.

The following services are core in the Strategic phase:

  • Optimised Infrastructure – including File and Print, Database Services, Directory Services, Security, Device Management, and Data Protection and Recovery
  • MIS – Management Information Systems
  • Portal
  • Unified Communication
  • Virtualisation – centralizing computing tasks to improve scalability and system performance

These, typically, will be delivered through three layers:

  • On-Premises – the school hosts key functions on their own servers
  • Data Centre/Private Cloud – the Local Education Authority (LEA) delivers services to schools from their servers
  • Public Cloud – the school receives services from the LEA, Ministry of Education and private suppliers from Public Cloud Services
School Server Infrastructure

Portal

The Strategic phase is characterised by the Connected Learning Community, the core of which is a portal that can be accessed from anywhere. For it to be effective it needs to be “role based” i.e. present users with information and tools relevant to their role and to them as individuals. In other words a teacher in the community sees the information relevant to all teachers, their fellow subject specialists, and also information specific to their particular group of students, their particular HR information, and their particular teaching content, tasks, calendar, e-mail etc.

A portal should give students, parents, managers, teachers, their own “spaces” and deliver to them the resources that are important individually to them through a single web page.  It aggregates information from diverse systems into one interface with a single sign-on ID – and organisation-wide search capabilities so that users can access relevant information quickly.  Teaching and administration staff can use the portal to distribute information to students based on their enrolment, classes, security group or other membership criteria, while enabling them to personalise the portal content and customise the layout to suit their needs.

A great Portal reference architecture is Twynham School. Twynham is a 1600+ Secondary school in Christchurch UK, built  a powerful collaboration platform – “Learning Gateway” – which allows students, staff and parents to work efficiently; develop independent and inter-dependence in their learning strategies; and support children in achieving their full potential. Twynham School won the BECTA ICT Excellence Award in 2008 for learning Beyond the Classroom and the schools works with over 400 schools internationally to support the development of their Learning Platforms.

Twynham School Portal Navigation bar

Mike Herrity at Twynham has published a detailed e-book explaining how the Learning Gateway is used: http://bit.ly/qJohiL

Microsoft have also published a full architectural guide explaining how Twynham built their Learning Gateway – http://bit.ly/qORAW5

Enabling many of the functions in the portal are 2 sub-systems – Content Management and Unified Communications & Collaboration.

Content Management Systems (CMS)

When ICT is fully implemented, vast amounts of content gets created.  In order to get maximum efficiencies from ICT, this content needs to be organised and managed in a way that means that people don’t replicate one another’s work.

A content management system in a connected learning community helps education institutions organise and facilitate the collaborative creation of documents and other content. They enable the full life cycle of content – from initial creation to delivery to end users.  CMS comprise document and records management, web content management, forms, search, library systems, curriculum frameworks, curriculum systems, curriculum exemplars and resource assemblers.

Unified Communications (UC) & Collaboration

Today it is typical that people will have multiple contact addresses – direct line phone number; mobile phone number;  e-mail; Instant Messenger; home number; personal mobile number; home e-mail, etc. Unified Communications (UC) takes identity and presence and then has all of these other ways of interacting simply connect up to that.

A single integrated identity can simplify how you find and communicate with others.  One integrated desktop application can provide easy access to all the ways users are likely to want to communicate.  Another key advantage to UC is that in using Voice over IP (VOIP) for telephone calls, it has the potential to significantly reduce communication costs.

UC enables students, teachers, parents and other stakeholders to confer and consult in the way that suits their work style by switching seamlessly between videoconferencing, telephone, email and instant messaging.

Also within UC are task and calendaring functions.

Data Driven Decision Making

In a schooling system, data driven decision making is supported by a huge number of information systems.  Any process that involves the creation and transmission of information can be considered an information system – even informal discussions.

The collective term for the information systems in schooling is Management Information Systems (MIS).

Functions Supported by an MIS

The functions that a Management Information System need to support are:

Improving Student Performance Progression Management
Learning Management Intelligent Intervention
Parents Engagement In Learning Better Teaching Decisions
Make Better Management Decisions Monitor, Analyse and Plan
Tactical Decision Making Data Visualisation
Manage Resources More Effectively Planning and budgeting
Financial Control Asset Control
Reporting Accountability and Alignment
Performance and Assessment Data KPIs, Scorecards, Dashboards and Reports
Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) Drive Administrative Efficiencies
Planning Organising
Controlling Co-ordinating
Management Information Systems – Functional Architecture

In this context, an information system really means an organised hierarchy of information sub-systems. Management Information System (MIS) is a term used as a container for all of the electronic information systems within a schooling system.  These systems vary in size, scope and capability, from packages that are implemented in relatively small organisations to cover student records alone, to enterprise-wide solutions that aim to cover most aspects of running large multi-site organisations.

A MIS includes the following sub-systems:

  • Decision Support Systems (DSS)
    • Finance
    • Performance Management
    • HR
    • Student Relationship Management (SRM)
    • Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)
    • Analytics and Business Intelligence (BI)
    • Timetabling
  • Student Information Systems (SIS)
    • Integrated Student Record
    • Electronic grade book
    • Attendance Management
    • Automated workflows
    • E-Forms
  • Learning Platform
    • Learning Management Systems (LMS)
    • Managed Learning Environment (MLE)
    • Virtual Learning Environments (VLE)
    • Content Management Systems (CMS)

For a full description, see Schooling at the Speed of Thought, Chapter 6, Managing Information.

Local Education Authority

In the Strategic Phase, the goal of service provision at Local Education Authority level is to deliver those services which when aggregated improve in quality and price.

Local Education Authorities can use their scale to negotiate the best prices for content, communication, support services etc. Many of the services requiring the most maintenance and management – e.g. learning services, system management, business intelligence, and administrative tasks such as payroll and HR, are delivered more cost effectively from a centralised point.  Other benefits include the use of greater amounts of data for decision making – an LEA with data from many schools can perceive more patterns than a single school with its limited pool of data.

Many LEA services are delivered through data centres built on top of optimised infrastructures. Increasingly data centres will become Private Clouds – essentially Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) within the data centre. The large scale and pay-as-you-go economics of Public Clouds aren’t available in typical Private Clouds. However, Private Clouds offer at least some of the scalability and elasticity benefits of Public Cloud but with additional control and customisation. Increasingly many of these services will be also be delivered from Public Clouds.

The services delivered by the LEA can be split into two main categories:

  • Schooling Enterprise Services
    • Monitoring, Analysis and Planning
    • Intelligent Intervention
    • Student Relationship Management
    • Administrative Processes
    • Operations
  • E-Learning Services
Local Education Authority Schooling Enterprise Architecture (SEA)

Ministry of Education

Some of the Schooling Enterprise Services delivered by LEAs to their schools and communities could be provided at National level from the Central Ministry of Education. Services such as strategy, policy, budgets, and curriculum are usually set and delegated at national level.

Computing functions at Ministry of Education level can be grouped into three main categories:

  • Internal departments – Curriculum, Policy, Research etc.
  • Regional Services – Resources and BI
  • National Services – Content (information services) and infrastructure – e.g. national level schooling enterprise internet backbone
Ministry of Education perspective

One of the most important functions at Ministry level is to have a “clear line of sight” of the performance of the schooling system. This enables BI analysis and for resources to then be focussed on the areas where they will have most impact.

Fitts and Aziza (Joey Fitts and Bruno Aziza, 2008) talk of a “line of sight” from strategic to operational to tactical decisions as the discipline that drives aligned execution. “Line of sight” means clear visibility of goals, and progress towards them at executive (strategic), management (operational), employees (tactical) levels.

“Clear line of sight” is about performance metric alignment across organisational layers. This can be thought of as an organisation chart for performance metrics, indicating how the various levels of the organisation’s performance metrics relate to one another. At school level, classroom teacher’s metrics roll up to their Head of Department, which in turn roll up to Deputy Principals, which in turn roll up to the Principal. In turn, and depending on the mode of operations, performance metrics for Principals should roll up to those of Local Authority Directors, which in turn finally roll up to the Ministry of Education.

Clear Line of Sight enables strategic allignment

Technology Building Blocks

Finally, pulling these building blocks together we get the following high level architecture:

Technology Building Blocks for Strategic Phase

Conclusion

Moving from the Enhanced Phase to the Strategic Phase is as much about management as ICT. In this phase, the technology is used a tool for getting better allignement between strategy set at MoE level to exectution at school level. At all levels, there are strategic decisions that ICT can help monitor, analyse, plan and execute.

In the next article in this series, we will explore the final phase – Transformation.

Taking the First Steps

Year-on-year $64bn is spent on ICT for schooling, but many schools around the world have yet to take their first steps to introducing ICT. Whilst the most advanced schools in the world can take full advantage of ICT, large tracts of the planet still don’t have grid electricity.

Figure 1. Huge areas of the world have no electricity, leave alone Internet and ICT

In 2007, the number of people with PCs passed the one billion mark – still a relatively small portion of the overall world population. The digital divide is still a defining characteristic of our age, and introducing ICT into schools is one way that governments are attempting to tackle this.

When technology is first introduced into schools, it tends to be used to supplement existing operations and processes. Schools begin to see the potential for ICT but operate in a typical “factory” approach with most learning, teaching and operational activities based on paper and students “receiving” their learning from their teachers. Typically it starts with teachers using a single computer with a projector, merely enhancing traditional teaching methods. The focus of computer use is to develop basic skills and students take turns to use the computers in computer labs.

Figure 2. Throughout the world, “computer labs” are considered an important first step

Challenges

Whilst OLPC was commendable for a number of reasons, the programme has proved that there is a lot more to introducing ICT into schools than simply “dumping” large numbers of laptops into the system. A recent study highlighted the kinds of challenges that need to be addressed in order to take full advantage of ICT in challenging areas.

“What happens when a school located 40km from the nearest town is suddenly burdened with the impossible task of providing power to 300 OLPC laptops?”. One school visited on the study, had only one low-voltage outlet located in the principal’s office… Many off-the-grid schools will not have Internet access either”.

A large scale ICT roll-out assumes high quality administrative processes, but this isn’t always available either – many countries still don’t keep central records of what schools are where, or how many students attended which schools. In some schools, teachers are even held personally responsible for any losses or damages, leading to lack of deployment. Finding trained technicians, familiar with local infrastructure and technology who can install and maintain ICT is often difficult too.

After a deployment of nearly half a million laptops to Peru’s poorest schoolchildren, most children didn’t even bring the devices home. In Peru’s roll-out, children were held responsible for reimbursing the school for any damages, many of which could easily occur during long treks or drives in mountainous terrain. Parents of these children soon asked their children to use the laptops as little as possible, rather than risking losing an entire year’s salary paying for broken devices. Another problem in Peru was lack of literacy. “A large majority of the kids have no idea where keys are located and sometimes don’t even know the letters.” For ICT to be useful, software and keyboards need to be in the local native language.

According to the same study, “the vast majority of teachers only care about one program: PowerPoint. Without training and incentives, the use laptops in the classroom just reinforce old techniques”.

Figure 3. Often ICT introduction will just enhance old techniques

Schools often deploy their first computing equipment for up to 10 years. This means that multiple generations of software need to run on single instances of hardware deployments. Computer technology must therefore be able to handle old content as well as new content – including curriculum materials, multimedia content, as well learning software titles.  Running all that content on a PC is a key challenge. Combine these issues with the various support challenges associated with ageing PC hardware and the result is an environment where the challenges seem to outweigh the benefits.

Schools taking the first steps towards ICT usgage tend to be price sensitive and because of this, cheap devices are widespread and common, e.g. refurbished computers >5 years old. In some cases low cost hardware designed specifically for schooling use processors and other key components that are roughly 5 years behind a new mid-range device.

Power, internet, and air quality are all factors in the deployment of technology solutions into schools. PCs and devices have to ‘just work’ in the face of highly variable power sources – often going down for hours and then spiking up to 10X the voltage levels upon resumption. In addition, internet connectivity to schools may be non-existent or at best highly variable – maybe Dial-up speeds, and only for certain hours a day, week, or month. In addition, internet connectivity could arrive in a non-uniform way such as over a satellite downlink, a DVD update, or an offline cache of static internet content. Air quality can be highly variable also, which in computing terms means there might be significant dust, sand, salt, and moisture build up which can affect a device’s longevity if not properly designed for.

Technical Requirements

Technology for schooling in challenging environments needs to have two key characteristics:

  • Resiliency. Uninterruptable power supply and surge protection are good places to start. At the beginning of a school day all the computers in the school need to start from a last known good state. When a problem arises, logical choices and low-risk options need to be presented to the user.
  • Adaptability. A key requirement is that when the school wants to connect a new client device it should easily detect it on the school network and provide the client with access to all appropriate network services (file storage, printer access, Internet access, etc.). When a school wants to connect an LCD projector, the appliance should recognize and pre-configure this device so that it is truly plug-and-play without the user having to know what resolution it should be set at or the make or model number.  If a school has a lab with ageing PC hardware and software the option to turn that PC into a thin client will help to extend the value of the school’s existing investment and limit exposure to future technical frustrations of dealing with older configurations. As new form factors emerge, it should be easy for them to be assimilated into the school network.

Students need straightforward user experiences such as easy storage and access of their files, and straightforward ways to log-in and store and retrieve their work. Even at the most basic levels, students like to personalise their PC experience to create a greater sense of ownership.

Teachers are focused on achieving a teaching objective and have little time for experiment and discovery. They need tools that require little training to understand and use, and resilient devices that when support is required it can be applied with “one-click” – e.g. easy restore, reset student PC, etc.

ICT decision makers at municipality, state or country level will want to be able to show an impact on learning outcomes – ideally during their term in office – from their investments in ICT. They will want to be able to increase economic opportunity by increasing academic achievement, building ICT skills and enabling access to online information to “bridge the digital divide”. Total cost of ownership will be a key factor in making these decisions.

Adoption of technology will not happen at scale anywhere without local suppliers, system builders, system integrators (SIs) and independent software vendors (ISVs). In rural towns and villages, these are likely to be “small shops” and may be responsible for a full 360 degree service – deploying, training and supporting the school. Suppliers need systems that don’t require extensive additional training to sell, customise and deploy. Flexibility for what devices can connect to network allows local system builders to offer “system + devices” packages.

Scenarios

Kiosk

In 1999, Sugata Mitra installed a computer connected to the Internet in a wall in a slum area in India and found that children below age 13 learned to use and surf the Internet without even knowing English. They taught themselves to use the mouse, learned many games and programs like Microsoft Paint, searched Hindi Web sites, and even removed viruses from files. Many were completely illiterate and could not understand word patterns or pronunciation; others had reading problems and low test scores in schools. Nevertheless, they could “read” the names of applications and explain their functions, even when their position on the screen was changed. They also learned many English words heard from the computer’s speakers. Children found solutions in groups and taught each other.

This kind of computer needs to be in a safe public place that the children associate with safety, free time, and play. Children in the “Hole in the Wall” project self-organise their learning. They develop computer literacy, Maths and English skills, improve their social values and get better at collaborating.

These results are replicable in many different parts of the world where “Hole in the Wall” experiments have been carried out, and “learning stations” can be provided in countries like India at an all-in cost of around $0.03 per child per day.

Another study conducted in low-income and rural areas of India found that students who had free computer access at public kiosks performed better on science and math tests than students without such access – Inamdar, P. and Kulkarni, A. (2007).

Mobile Classrooms

In rural areas from Cyprus to Tunisia to India and even in the United States, busses and vans are frequently used to provide mobile ICT classroom facilities. For example, The Commonwealth Youth Programme Technology Empowerment Centre on Wheels (CYPTEC) enables students in villages in India to acquire ICT skills and become more employable. CYTPEC uses a van fitted with several desktop computers, mobile internet, and sound systems – all powered by a generator.

A typical mobile classroom will be equipped with the around 10 workstations, appropriate furniture, a server, physical and virtual security, broadband satellite/Wi-Fi/3G, audio-visual, videoconference equipment and off-grid power generation – and ensure that people with disabilities can use the facilities.

In a particularly innovative solution, the time used to take children back-and-fore to school in busses is used for learning. In rural Arkansas school buses shuttle some students for over two hours a day, so Hector School District has teamed up with Vanderbilt University to make the buses into “mobile classrooms”. One school bus has received mounted television screens that show math and science programs to students. Seats are equipped with headphones for the children to use.

A few years ago, literacy rates in the Western Cape in South Africa needed boosting. The Western Cape has 2000 schools, almost all of which are difficult to get to and many have no electricity. There are few teachers so teaching children to read and write is extremely difficult. The solution here is a mobile unit, a 4 wheel drive and a teacher trained to take children/adults through an intensive reading programme using voice recognition and basic literacy software on the laptops.

First School PCs

 

A good starting point for permanent ICT facilities in schools is a single PC in a shared space with a projector, screen and printer. A first step towards teachers exploiting the power of technology includes activities such as using a PC and printer to produce worksheets, and using the PC and a data projector to present learning content. Having soft copies of documents means that teachers are easily able to save and reuse resources, thereby saving time. In this model teachers have educational tools with immediate value, and this provides a foundation to grow the value of ICT investments. This scenario enables teacher-led activities using multimedia and educational content via an LCD projector where students are recipients of content (simulations, video clips, ppts, DVDs, etc.). Content can be delivered with or without access to the Internet through media-stored and cached Web-content.

Sharing applications is a good way to get maximum value from PCs. Using Mouse Mischief, approximately 5-25 students, each with his or her own mouse, can answer multiple choice questions or draw on a shared screen. Sample lessons can be found here.

In the first stages of implementing computers in schools, it’s critical that at least one computer is put to administrative use. This should be used for student and teacher records, funding, staff pay, course records, equipment inventory and operational purposes. Teacher’s time can be better used when replacing paper-based methods with electronic communication. Tasks such as basic record keeping, issuing standard letters and communications, and timetabling all become a lot easier when using ICT.

Computer Lab

 

Typically, a first step to providing classes of students with access will start with a “lab”. Decisions need to be made about arranging worktables, for example, U or L shapes allow group interaction. An “island” arrangement with two PCs on each side of a table works well and encourages students to share information. Students will typically use computers primarily for research – web, cached content, DVD – and productivity (e.g. word processing and spreadsheets). Computer labs need a server to enable:

  • File/print/back-up/restore
  • Teacher-driven classroom management & orchestration of client PCs
  • Labs to easily grow/upgrade with a range of different kinds of clients
  • Access to learning content

Making the computers available to the wider community when not being used by students has many benefits. A local pool of skills, knowledge and interest in ICT can be developed, and small charges for training can be made, helping to meet costs. To deliver this service to the community, schools need to provide secure access. PCs have high value, so physical and software security is also usually required – for example “Kensington® Locks”, burglar bars on windows, padlocked doors, biometrics, access controlled areas, storage units for laptops and other mobile technologies. Disablement and recovery security tools, and hard-disk encryption such as bit locker should also be used.

Building blocks

Electricity

In many parts of the world, the electricity supply to schools is a major issue, but there are a range of technologies that can address this. The main options for off-grid power solutions are solar power, diesel/biofuel generators, wind power, hydrogen fuel cell, moped and stove.

Figure 4. Solar panels in a school in South Africa

Of these, solar is an increasingly popular option, especially as the price of diesel fuel continues to rise, with companies such as Inveneo delivering solar based solutions. In a UNHCR deployment in a refugee camp, for which Microsoft provided the computing solution, electricity is provided through NAPS Universal Power Packs. One NAPS Power Pack provides power for an infrastructure module with server, printer, wireless router, and projector or teacher work station. Other NAPS Power Packs power 4 workstations, and these can be added to the network in groups.

No schooling system wants to waste electricity so several considerations need to be made:

  • Form factors matter. Even without adding a monitor, a typical desktop computer can consume at a minimum more than 3x the power that a laptop consumes. The extra electricity used by desktops tends to dissipate as heat, which in turn requires more power in the form of air conditioning to remove.
  • The age and price of the computer matter too. Typically cheaper and older desktop computers will consume more electricity than newer, better quality laptops.
  • The operating system. For example, Windows 7 was designed to be the most energy efficient operating system available and used in conjunction with the right hardware can deliver considerable savings, even on older hardware.

Internet Access

Figure 6. Wi-Fi in a school in South Africa

Where providing electricity is a challenge, providing Internet access can be even more so. For areas not able to get broadband/wired access, there are many Internet access solutions available, the key ones being:

Dial-up

This is one of the simplest and oldest forms of Internet access and uses a normal phone line to connect a computer to an Internet Service Provider. Its relatively inexpensive, and widely availability where phone lines are present, but it’s also the slowest form of access with a maximum speed of 56Kbps. Another problem is that in schools which have only one phone line, others cannot use the phone while the computer is connected to the Internet.

Cellular

Cellular-based access requires a cell phone network that offers 3G or CDMA 2000 data and voice services. A cellular modem is required to connect a computer or computer network to the Internet via a cell phone provider. Data services charge according to the length of time you are connected to the network and the amount of data transmitted and/or received. Access speeds range from 56Kbps to over 500Kbps. This speed depends on the type of service available, the strength of the cell signal, the distance from the nearest cell transceiver, and local physical environment factors. The advantage of cellular networks are that they are widely available, but relative costs and fluctuating speeds mean that it’s not the best option for always-on, shared access, and high volumes of data.

Satellite

Satellite access enables Internet access in rural and remote areas where copper wire and fibre based options are not available. This option requires installation of a satellite dish and receiver which is then connected to the Internet router. Speeds range from 64Kbps to 5Mbps uploading and 128Kbps to 11Mbps downloading. Because upload times are faster than download times, ‘latency’ (i.e. the time that it takes from mouse click to seeing content in the browser) is long. Satellite connections can also be affected by rain and dust storms. Whilst its available almost everywhere, a satellite link must be within the “line of sight” of transmitting satellites.

Wi-Fi, WiMax

These two forms of wireless Internet access are usually available in larger towns and cities. These can be used for the delivery of a service to a specific customer or to provide access across an entire city. Wi-Fi can provide “point-to-point” access to locations up to 30 Km away, but this demands clear-line-of-sight between the transceiver and the location it is serving, a directional antenna and wireless receiver. WiMax, which is less commonly available, only requires a WiMax receiver.

Caching

Regardless of what internet access model is used, caching can allow users to experience less of a delay when their PC requests data from the network. For example, Windows 7 BranchCache caches data locally, enabling a better user experience.

Devices

There is a huge temptation to buy cheap and low-impact devices, but a golden rule is to understand that you generally get what you pay for. For example, colour inkjet printers are usually the least expensive to buy but often have the highest per page printing costs. Same applies to computers – cheap computers are cheap for a reason and will probably end up costing more in the longer run through having to maintain sub-standard components and higher electricity consumption. As discussed, the best approach is laptops for which a typical entry-level specification is 3GHz (clock) speed, 500GB Hard Drive (HDD) with 2GB RAM.

There’s also a temptation to buy devices other than PCs, including some ‘slate’ devices which have been designed primarily for content consumption. As discussed in detail in the “Learning Software 2.0” article, enabling children to create content is far more important than just enabling them to consume it, so laptops have a far higher potential return on investment.

Projectors and screens are also essential hardware, and one clever solution from South Africa – the compujector – combines a computer and a projector in one device – see http://www.astralab.co.za

Wireless routers should be purchased with built in security, Virtual Private Network (VPN), Firewall, and Ethernet capabilities.

It’s important to consider cabinets for securely storing and charging laptops too. Sometimes called “Classroom on Wheels”, these enable computers to be taken to different parts of the school. Lapsafe, is one leading manufacture worth checking out.

Network Management

With power, internet access, security and the right kind of facilities in place, the next challenge is to manage the devices so they are used effectively. This means controlling how the computers are used – creating and managing accounts; sharing files and learning materials; installing applications; monitoring and managing usage and hardware; protecting computers from viruses etc.

Figure 7. Windows Mulitpoint Server – controlling a mix of client computers

Windows Multipoint Server 2011 provides a solution which enables one computer to be used by up to 10 users, each with their own monitor, keyboard and mouse. This approach lowers the total cost of ownership by 66% compared to a traditional PC deployment, which typically uses a model that requires separate servers to enable file and hardware sharing, and computer management. WMS 2011 also enables teachers to easily control a classroom network, including networked client devices such as laptops. This was put to great effect in Haiti where, following the recent earthquake there, computer labs were hastily assembled with off-grid power solutions to deliver learning services.

Training

At this stage, training is about two key things – acquiring basic computing concepts and learning new pedagogic methods. Microsoft Digital Literacy helps students learn and assess their understanding of basic computing concepts and acquire 21st Century skills; and training for teachers in new pedagogic methods, which organisations such as Education Impact can provide .

Architectures

The main building blocks for introducing ICT into schools are as follows:

Figure 8. Key building blocks for taking the first steps

Who owns the computer makes a lot of difference. This decision narrows the access option to 1:1 – one device per student. If students get to take them home, the need for secure storage and charging diminishes – on the assumption that the computers can be used throughout the school. This in turn leads to decisions about pedagogy – will usage be restricted to a single room, or will students use the devices from lesson to lesson?

Figure 9. Different access options

Finally, decisions about lab layout are important too. Here the options range from “traditional” to “collaborative”.

Figure 10. Traditional classroom layout

Figure 11. Collaborative classroom layout

Is it worth the effort?

Introducing ICT into schools for the first time is costly and time-consuming. In Queensland Australia, 20 preparatory steps are taken before laptops are introduced into schools. First-time ICT introduction into any organisation is a non-trivial task.

According to the World Bank, much of the rationale for using ICT to benefit education has focused on its potential for bringing about changes in the teaching-learning paradigm. In practice, however, ICT is most often used to support existing teaching and learning practices with new and expensive tools.

But the World Bank goes on to say “consensus seems to argue that the introduction and use of ICT in education can be a useful tool to help promote and enable educational reform; ICT is both an important motivational tool for learning, and can promote greater efficiencies in education systems and practices”. With $2.4trn/year spent on schooling, with some systems just 7% effective – YES! it simply has to be worth taking these first steps.

Resources:

Thanks to Nasha Fitter and Rob Bayuk.